Saturday, March 14, 2020

Free Essays on Analysis Of “Leda And The Swan”

seem to jump out at the reader. As in line one where it says â€Å"A sudden blow: the great wings beating still† you can feel the strong blow of the wings. In line three the reader can just imagine a big powerful swan grabbing Leda by the hair and holding her close to him. Then in line six Yeats gives the reader a clue that the swan is the almighty Zeus prying open the legs of Leda because he writes, â€Å"The feathered glory†, which is Zeus,† from her loosening thighs?† which is Leda trying to stop the swan from doing this to her. Yeats also gives the reader the feeling that Leda is getting raped and not liking it this is shown in lines five and six where it states â€Å" How can those terrified vague fingers push... Free Essays on Analysis Of â€Å"Leda And The Swan† Free Essays on Analysis Of â€Å"Leda And The Swan† In the poem Leda and the swan written by William butler Yeats, there are some allusions and myths that that makeup this poem. Yeats describes the scene in much detail by using some very vivid imagery. This poem follows the Greek myth of how Leda was raped by Zeus who had turned into a swan to make sure that no one knew who he was. First there is the concept of the myth in this poem. It is form the Greek mythology of the birth of the beautiful Helen. This is also the allusion of the poem. Allusion is a brief reference to a person, place or event that readers are supposed to recognize. The story starts off with Leda. Leda is the wife of Tyndareus, the king of Sparta. Leda also was the mother to many children, including Helen of Troy, the heroine Clytemnestra, and the twins Castor and Polydeuces, also known as the Dioscuri. But Tyndareus was not the father of all of her children. The on that myth tells is the father of Helen. The story is that Zeus; the supreme god turns himself into a swan, and raped Leda. Then Leda laid an egg from which Helen was born. Leda laid the egg because Zeus raped her in the form of a swan. One of the things that make this poem work is the imagery that Yeats puts in the poem. He makes the words seem to jump out at the reader. As in line one where it says â€Å"A sudden blow: the great wings beating still† you can feel the strong blow of the wings. In line three the reader can just imagine a big powerful swan grabbing Leda by the hair and holding her close to him. Then in line six Yeats gives the reader a clue that the swan is the almighty Zeus prying open the legs of Leda because he writes, â€Å"The feathered glory†, which is Zeus,† from her loosening thighs?† which is Leda trying to stop the swan from doing this to her. Yeats also gives the reader the feeling that Leda is getting raped and not liking it this is shown in lines five and six where it states â€Å" How can those terrified vague fingers push...

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Cultural Analysis Paper Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Cultural Analysis Paper - Assignment Example Mumbai in India. These movies are produced essentially in Hindi, the national Language of India. Movies are essentially a form of media that along with entertaining the audience are also cultural representation of a country. Cinema and national identity are always interlinked. A film reflects the social, cultural and economic aspects on national level. Techniques of filmmaking are based on the targeted audience based on their nationality and culture. Today Asian movies including the Indian cinema is making prominent place in the European and American markets. Bollywood is considered as the largest film production in the world. India is a diverse country rich with different religions, cultures and social class. Indian movies explore in explicit but benign manner the class divisions in the society. A popular 2001 film Lagaan which is based on a game of cricket played by some local villagers, oppressed by high taxes, against the British regime has also depicted class prejudice as a sub theme. When the central character, Bhuvan began to prepare the villagers for the match, he invit ed the untouchable Kachra to join much to the wrath of the other players. India being a culturally diverse country, cinema audience has always been segmented. While making movies, producers keep in mind the varied interests of different sections of the society and therefore Bollywood movies are known for their culturally rich themes. One most prominent division found in Bollywood movies is art and commercial (mainstream) cinema. However, in recent years the boundaries between the two have been blurred to a large extent. The common observation is that Bollywood movies with different genre of culture appeals to different sections of the society. While action based movies have more popularity among the lower classes, movies based on social class divisions appeal more to the upper classes. Likewise, movies with Islamic themes, for instance the 1992 hit

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Gender, sex ( with using CAUSE AND EFFECT style) Essay

Gender, sex ( with using CAUSE AND EFFECT style) - Essay Example A child will learn from its parents the difference between man and woman, boy and girl and identify the attributes that are associated with each term. In this respect, a childs idea of a man would be different in a household where the male is the breadwinner as opposed to the female, and vice versa. Although these gender categories are highly stereotypical, they form the basis for the childs basic understanding of gender and what it means to be female or male. Secondly, cultural beliefs play a large part also, with the views of the parents a strong factor. For instance, in Saudi Arabia, a number of people may believe that women were born only in order to serve a men or for giving birth to a child and then to raise him. In the same vein, and to use an extreme example, Eskimo men exploit their wives in order to set up trading associations with other Eskimos. They frequently present their wives sexual services in front of other Eskimo man just to strengthen the hunting or business relationship. In an Eskimo household, imagine how a young girl would see herself after being bared to these ideas over her first 5 years at home. Of course, this is an extreme example but it substantiates the point. Another aspect is media, media also uses interpellation as a form of recruitment that can inspire individuals to recreate their gender identity, presenting issues in a light that encourage people to join up or take a stand thus aiding the expansion of a collective identity amongst a specific gender. Phrases such as: "It was recognized that people label someone a feminist when someone expresses emotions that distinguish women from doormats," are designed to incite people into joining a shared individuality in the form of a group, in this case feminism. Lastly, our peers are a huge influence on the way that we see gender, and identify with the requirements of the same. The boys in a childs school may all play football, and therefore it is

Friday, January 31, 2020

Minorities at War Essay Example for Free

Minorities at War Essay Many people’s lives changed in various ways during and after the World War II. The lives of women and minorities such as African Americans and Native Americans, changed drastically mostly in a positive way. Just like during most wars, women found jobs and opportunities. This was mainly because men and husbands went to work in industries and factories in different parts of the country while others went to war as soldiers. With reduction in the male taskforce, young girls and married women had to take up responsibilities and jobs that were traditionally considered to be for men (Mays 17). Unlike the First World War, where women served as secretaries and nurses, in the Second World War they were placed in more skilled jobs such as: research, electronics, engineering and mechanics (Mays 17). The Women’s Army Corps was created in 1942, which enabled women to participate in combat fields as pilots and other support personnel but not in direct combat. The war served as a major platform for women in society, women started being viewed as useful in various fields and not just as caregivers. The opportunity to take part in jobs that were traditionally considered for men also empowered women psychologically (Mays 17). The fight for equality for all citizens began after the civil war where President Lincoln freed the slaves. The Select Service Act was passed in 1940, allowing Hispanics, Native-Americans and African-Americans to enroll to all the branches of the army. The war offered opportunities for many African Americans to escape poverty in their rural homes (Reinhardt and Ganzel). Many blacks enlisted in the army trying to escape a long period of tenant farming and Depression in the Midwest and South. The army recruited Negroes but still practiced segregation (Reinhardt and Ganzel). In the chaos of war, especially after Pearl Harbor, the army had to work together and segregation was broken. After the war, many blacks opted to remain in towns and do work related to what they did in the army instead of going back to their rural homes (Reinhardt and Ganzel). Movements for fighting for civil rights had been created. The post-war era, was a period of exceptional struggle by the African Americans against the second class citizenship that had been accorded to them. They resisted racial discrimination and segregation through nationwide protests, boycotts, rallies and civil disobedience (Reinhardt and Ganzel). Many blacks joined civil rights movements and legal efforts were made to challenge segregation and inequality through courts. These efforts were rewarded with the passing of the Civil Rights Act in 1964 which outlawed racism and segregation. In 1965, the Voting Rights Act was also passed allowing all races to vote. The passing of these acts was a great step in the demise of second class citizenship (Reinhardt and Ganzel). The struggle by the blacks to achieve equality inspired and influenced other civil rights groups as well such as Native–Americans and Hispanics. The war as witnessed was a great turning point for both women and minorities in America. They were all empowered by the situations created by the war to improve their status in society and fight for their rights. Work Cited: Mays, Dorothy A. Women in early America: struggle, survival, and freedom in a new world. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO Inc. Publishers, 2004. Reinhardt, Claudia and Ganzel, Bill. â€Å"Civil Rights for Minorities†. Wesley Living History Farm. 26 August 2010 from: http://www. livinghistoryfarm. org/farminginthe40s/life_18. html

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Compare and contrast the poets attitudes to and experiences of war in :: English Literature

Compare and contrast the poet's attitudes to and experiences of war in Drummer Hodge and The soldier - How does the poet's use of language effect the readers' perception of war? Drummer Hodge is written about the Boer war (around 1899 - 1902), which was a war between the British and the Boers. The feature of the poem is a Wessex drummer boy who was killed in this war. The poem starts with the end of the boy's life as his body is disposed of practically, with no dignity, this gives the reader the idea that war has a bigger picture and the life of one boy does not matter as long as the country prevails; "They throw in Drummer Hodge, to rest Uncoffined - just as found" this gives the image across that the boy was buried with no dignity, no ceremony and with indifference. From this the reader clearly gets a rather horrible and cold image of the war and the way in which people were disposed of, the line also expresses how much life is lost in a war. The next line expresses the way in which he has no grave stone, just a pile of rocks over his body. I think this shows the way that in war, you die and know body knows were you are, so nobody can come to your grave to mourn you. "His landmark is a kopje-crest" in some ways the poet tries to tell us that the land surrounding the boy's grave has become part of him and the land will respect him and give him his dignity. This may give the reader the thought that in war maybe the best way out is death as you will then be eternally respected. In the last lines of the first stanza the poet writes about how the boy entered the war in a foreign place and there is nothing familiar to him; "And foreign constellations west Each night above his mound." The poet writes about how he was buried under a foreign sky in a strange place which was far away from his home. This gives the reader the impression that Drummer Hodge is more of a memory as he died so far away from his home. The second stanza goes on to explain the way in which he was unprepared for the war: "Young Hodge the Drummer Never knew - Fresh from his wessex home." The poet has written about how the young boy did not know what he had let himself in for, the young boy did not

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Social Communication in Nation Building

The basis of nationality is the sense of belonging to the same nation and the desire on the part of its members to live with each other at this level of community. When the political scientist wants to de fine or locate this subjective sense of community, he has used such objective criteria as common language, common history, common territory, and so forth. It is clear that ail these criteria are an expression of something more basic—shared experience.This shared experience, which may lead to the necessary mutual trust among members of a given society and to the feeling that this group as a group is different from others, contributes continuously to national unity. National unity likewise makes shared experience more possible. To determine the human and geographie frontiers of a nation the political scientist must find ways to examine this shared experience.The problems in the Tiers Monde are greater with regard to such research than they are in Europe because much of the nece ssary data are not available. Research at very basic levels with some new methods is necessary. Karl W. Deutsch, professor of political science at Yale University, has proposed a quantitative interdisciplinary way to examine shared experience and, indirectly, the sense of community. 1 He suggests that one measure the quantities of communications among a given people to find out how much contact they have.For this one must use criteria such as flows of letters, telegrams, movement of vehicles, trains, planes, telephone calls, mass media of communication, location of markets, settlement patterns, and population movements, he says. If it is possible to examine these different forms of communication, or as many as possible of them, it is equally possible, he says, to estimate shared experience and make predictions about increases or decreases in shared experience. The first stage in this process, that of physical contact, is called â€Å"mobilization†.People who have intensive co mmunications with each other are â€Å"mobilized†1 for shared experiences and are â€Å"mobiliz-ed† into a current of communications which may eventually change a physical relationship into an affective relationship. The second stage is a change in the sentiments and attitudes of the people; it is called â€Å"assimilation†. People find that, on the basis of shared experience, they communicate increasingly more effectively with members of a particular society than with others. In other words, when the â€Å"communication habits† of a population become ncreasingly standardized within a group composed of smaller groups, assimilation of the smaller groups to the larger one is occurring: â€Å"If the statistical weight of standardized experience is large, and the weight of recalled information within the [smaller] group is relatively small, and the statistical weight of feedback information about the [smaller] group's peculiar responses is likewise small, th en the responses of such a group would differ from the responses of other groups in the same situation by a converging series, until the remaining differences might fall below the threshold of political significance.This is the process of assimilation. â€Å"2 People may also find that there are advantages to be gained in belong-ing to this new community, but there may never be a conscious choice which is made. Because a study of assimilation is a study of beliefs, values and conceptions, different kinds of data are necessary. Professor Deutsch says that there are also quantifiable.According to him, the â€Å"rate of assimilation† depends on certain linguistic, economie, and cultural â€Å"balances†: similarities in linguistic habits must be balanced, for example, against differences in value, material rewards for assimilation must be balanced against rewards for non-assimilation. To measure values he says it is necessary to give psychological tests to considerable nu mbers of people3 and to measure rewards it is necessary, in part, to examine economie surveys to determine where people work and how much they get paid. The problems involved in using these criteria are insurmontable at present. The data for these â€Å"balances† are lacking, and even if one had the men, the money, the machines, and the time necessary, or as many as possible of them, it is equally possible, he says, to estimate shared experience and make predictions about increases or decreases in shared experience. The first stage in this process, that of physical contact, is called â€Å"mobilization†.People who have intensive communications with each other are â€Å"mobilized†1 for shared experiences and are â€Å"mobiliz-ed† into a current of communications which may eventually change a physical relationship into an affective relationship. The second stage is a change in the sentiments and attitudes of the people; it is called â€Å"assimilation†. People find that, on the basis of shared experience, they communicate increasingly more effectively with members of a particular society than with others.In other words, when the â€Å"communication habits† of a population become increasingly standardized within a group composed of smaller groups, assimilation of the smaller groups to the larger one is occurring: â€Å"If the statistical weight of standardized experience is large, and the weight of recalled information within the [smaller] group is relatively small, and the statistical weight of feedback information about the [smaller] group's peculiar responses is likewise small, then the responses of such a group would differ from the responses of other groups in the same situation by a converging series, until the remaining differences might fall below the threshold of political significance. This is the process of assimilation. â€Å"2 People may also find that there are advantages to be gained in belong-ing to this new community, but there may never be a conscious choice which is made. Because a study of assimilation is a study of beliefs, values and conceptions, different kinds of data are necessary. Professor Deutsch says that there are also quantifiable.According to him, the â€Å"rate of assimilation† depends on certain linguistic, economie, and cultural â€Å"balances†: similarities in linguistic habits must be balanced, for example, against differences in value, material rewards for assimilation must be balanced against rewards for non-assimilation. To measure values he says it is necessary to give psychological tests to considerable numbers of people3 and to measure rewards it is necessary, in part, to examine economie surveys to determine where people work and how much they get paid. 4 The problems involved in using these criteria are insurmontable at present. The data for these â€Å"balances† are lacking, and even if one had the men, the money, the machines, and the time necessary, villages or in the same village. These quantifiable data served as a basis for a study of mobilization.In order to validate conclusions based on the quantitative census data I took a tour of the country during which I visited every region and lived in a few selected villages for periods of three days to a week. In the course of this tour I found that one way to investigate attitudes and assimilation was by oral histories and conceptions of kinship. My use of these histories was different from that of Professor Hubert Deschamps who had made an extensive tour of the country in 1961 to collect and record oral histories as part of a large project to write the history of Gabon. 1 As an historian he was naturally interest-ed in recording the facts of the past. For me, as a political scientist, the â€Å"truth† was irrelevant.I was interested in history as ideology: how were present relationships between tribes justified in the history, what was the place held b y neighboring tribes in a given history, how were history and conceptions of kinship infmenced by present settlement patterns. I thought that these two criteria, settlement patterns and histories, could serve as a basis for estimations of trends in assimilation and mobilization and could show the relationship between non-quantifiable attitudes and quantifiable social communications. The following are some of my findings. Mobilization Gabon may be crudely divided into three generai zones of mobilization: places where people are relatively non-mobilized, where they are partially mobilized, and where they are mobilized for intensive contact with people of different ethnie groups.I have called these zones Heartland, Contact, and National. The Heartland Zone is a group of contiguous cantons in which one ethnie group or tribe clearly predominates with at least 80% of the total population. Internai communication is fairly good and may be better than means which link the area with other par ts of the country. Contact Zones are on the edges of Heartland Zones; from about 50% to 80% of the people belong to one tribe. Such zones are cantons in which people of different tribes live in adjoining villages or in the same village; or they are centers of attraction such as administrative posts and markets to which people from different Heartlands travel regularly.They are most likely along roads and rivers which provide a link between Heartland Zones. There may be more mechanical means of communication in a Contact Zone than in a Heartland. National Zones are groups of contiguous cantons and large centers of attraction in which no tribe accounts for 50% of the total population. The internai means of communication are best here: they are public, mechanical, and regular. It is usually the one place where most decisions affecting the whole country are made. A. A Heartland. The largest Heartland in Gabon is that of the Fang who account for one-third of the total population of the c ountry. 1 The center of this Heartland orresponds with the administrative region of Woleu-Ntem in the northern half of the country along the Camerounese frontier. The region is relatively isolated from the rest of Gabon but has regular contact with Cameroun and Spanish Guinea by land and water. The only road to Libreville has been in poor condition even during the dry season; the rains often close the road completely. While there is regular air and telegraphie communication between Libreville and administrative centers of Woleu-Ntem, there is no regular land transportation. By contrast, fair roads extend into Cameroun and Spanish Guinea where close relatives of the Fang, the Bulu, live.Merchandise is imported along these routes while coffee and cocoa exports leave Woleu-Ntem through the Cameroun. 2 Some Fang take advantage of the road to the Cameroun to attend Camerounese technical schools and go to Camerounese hospitals (particularly a missionary-run hospital not far from the front ier). Radio Cameroun is a popular source of information and entertainment. For 14 of the 16 cantons of Woleu Ntem there is a regular service of autocars which link the administrative centers of the region. For example, two little Renault cars leave Oyem, the administrative capital, every day for each canton except that of Medouneu to the far west and Lalara to the south.There are frequent cars from Oyem or Bitam to Spanish Guinea and Cameroun. Another means of internai communication has been a regional newspaper published by some Fang teachers. In 1962 it contained mainly Fang stories and essays on â€Å"the true Fang custom†. In spite 1. For studies of the Fang see Georges Balandier, Sociologie actuelle de l'Afrique Noire, Paris, 1963. P. Alexandre and J. Binet, Le Groupe dit Pahouin, Paris, 1958. James Fernandez, Redistributive Acculturation in Fang Culture, unpublished, Northwestern, 1963. 2. Neither Libreville nor Port-Gentil, which are both on the ocean, have a port whic h can adequately accomodate large ships. f the great preponderance of Fang in the region, it was printed in French and was issued in only 75 copies. About 55,000 out of a total adult population of 56,500, or 98% are Fang in this region. 1 In the canton of Woleu, for example, there are 5,531 Africans of whom 5,473 are Fang. Non-Fang live in well-defined quarters in the town of Oyem; most of these people are Bulu merchants from southern Cameroun or Bakota who have moved from a neighboring region to work as servants or to attend a Roman Catholic secondary school. While these â€Å"foreigners† move into the Woleu-Ntem, the present Fang residents are fairly stationary. The census indicates that 80% of the men between the ages of 15 and 59 were born in the place the census taker found them.However, only 12% of the women were born in the place they were counted. 2 This does not mean that many Fang have not moved outside the Woleu-Ntem for many have; it means that Fang maies, who sti ll live in the region, have an interest in continuing to live in the village where they were born and that they find wives outside their village. Several women in each of the villages along the Guinea and Cameroun frontiers indicated that they were born in these neighboring states. Contiguous with the Woleu-Ntem are eight cantons which are an extension of the Heartland. The Fang have moved into these particul-ar cantons partly because the ways of communication exist.For example, the administrative region of Ogooue-Ivindo has three cantons adjacent to the Fang Heartland. In two of these cantons the Fang represent 80% or more of the total population and in the third they represent only 2% of the total population. The difference is that the two cantons with high Fang percentages are linked to the Woleu-Ntem by a river and a road while the other has no such link. In the sixteen cantons of Woleu-Ntem plus the eight cantons in adjacent regions which constitute the Heartland there are 70,0 00 Fang out of a total Fang population in Gabon of 106,000. On the basis of settlement patterns 66% of the Fang are, therefore, non-mobilized. Their contacts are almost exclusively with other Fang.Table I indicates that over half the Gabonese have no contact with people of tribes different from their own. Not ail the tribes of Gabon have Heartlands; of those who do have Heartlands 62% live in them. The total population of the country (14 and older) was approximately 285 000. 3 If the total population 1. Unless otherwise noted ail census figures refer to people 14 and older. 2. Recensement et enquete demographiques ic6o-ic6i: Resultats provisoires ensemble du Gabon, Service de Cooperation de l'Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes economiques, Paris, 1963, p. 24. 3. Ail the calculations, unless otherwise noted, are my own; they are based

Monday, January 6, 2020

The Special Education System On Those With Disabilities

Abstract: The special education system in the United states has drastically changed, but some are questioning where it stands; is it for the better, or for the worse? Many can agree that improvements have helped shape education Acts and school environments which, were proposed in meeting the needs of students with disabilities, but others questioned if it had, at all, started with distinguishing the purpose of inclusion, and if so, is it key in understanding the impact of the special education system on those with disabilities? In order to properly grasp the concept of inclusion, one would have to examine a series of documented research done on inclusion, and how it incorporates to a multitude of opportunities opening up to students†¦show more content†¦The controversy of inclusion being an ideal method is still being debated, and it has left the question of whether or not it has helped the mentally disabled/ill gain opportunities. Like all methods, it has to have certain criteria to make it work the way it’s supposed to. With that said, Colleen F. Tomko defines inclusion being as not just a process, but an action in which someone is included. Inclusion is supposed to make people feel like they belong and have a very important role in their community. Tomko explains that inclusion works in all sorts of environments; schools, church, and even your workplace. Therefore, it is a paragon for amplifying the opportunities created through the special needs program Methods: In this paper there will be an examination of students with special needs, whether that they be labeled as mentally ill or disabled, and whether or not inclusion has benefited them in any way. In the process of researching I will use developed methods such as: Case study to asses Acts and trials that helped better shape the special education program, evaluation research is also a method I will be using to contribute to the reliability of my sources, as well as using content analysis to determine if my sources provide valuable input for my study. With that said, there will be deeper examination of how inclusion works not only in school,